Trips

Species
Translate in french

Common reef octopus

Scientific name: Octopus cyanea

Size: Coat up to 6.3 inches and arms up to 31.5 inches

Color: Red brown, but can change texture and color

Distinguishing feature: Average length less than 1m with arms 4 times larger than the coat. Brown ocelli circled with clear at the base of arms 2 and 3. Red brown with possible white spots.

Where did we see it: Bali and Gili, Zanzibar, Thailand, French polynesia, Mexico, Mayotte, Maldives, Raja Ampat

Common reef octopus of Maldives

Common reef octopus

Scientific name: Octopus cyanea

Size: Coat up to 6.3 inches and arms up to 31.5 inches

Color: Red brown, but can change texture and color

Distinguishing feature: Average length less than 1m with arms 4 times larger than the coat. Brown ocelli circled with clear at the base of arms 2 and 3. Red brown with possible white spots.

Where did we see it: Bali and Gili, Zanzibar, Thailand, French polynesia, Mexico, Mayotte, Maldives, Raja Ampat

In detail

To reproduce, the male repeatedly touches the woman. Initially to confirm the sex, then to deposit spermatophores that will move along the female's arm and release the spermatozoa. This several times between 1m30 and 3h.

The female dies of exhaustion and hunger 10 days after the last hatching because she does not eat anymore from 2 weeks before the laying. The male dies of senescence (slowing of the vital activity) a priori because of the optical gland which controls the reproduction and whose hyperactivity after this one would trigger this decadence.

The species therefore lives between 12 to 15 months.

This species is - in addition to being remarkable for its changes of livery and texture - extremely intelligent: capable of strong memorization, decision making, emotional reactions, learning by observation and reactions of discrimination. >
Researchers also come to think that man is no longer the only conscious being and that octopus has joined this group.

Our pictures of common reef octopus

The different species of Octopus we have seen

Did you know?

Do you want to learn more about marine life or travel?
Your first name:

Your email: